Biblical Tour Turkey

Biblical Tour Turkey

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Mt. Ararat PDF Print E-mail

                                                                             Gen. 8:4, 11 Kings 19:37, Isa. 37:38

Over the centuries, the area has been contested territory between several states. The first unified state to rule the region surrounding the mountain was ancient Urartu. After the decline of Urartu following invasions by Scythians and the Medes in 585 BC, a semi-independent Armenian state emerged under the rule of the Orontid Dynasty, the members of which frequently intermarried with their overlords, the Achaemenid Persians. After the defeat of the Achaemenids by Alexander the Great in 330 BC, the Orontids gained autonomy, albeit under Macedonian influence.

Antiochus the Great briefly subjugated Armenia in 201 BC ending Orontid rule in region. After the defeat of Antiochus in the Battle of Magnesia, a new independent Armenian Kingdom emerged in 198 BC that lasted for over six centuries until 428, briefly being annexed to the Roman Empire by Trajan from 114 to 118. Following the partition of the Armenian Kingdom between the Roman Empire and Sassanid Persia in 428, the region was a constant battleground between the two, and afterwards between the Arab Caliphate and the Byzantine Empire.

Ararat was retaken by a new Armenian Kingdom under the Bagratuni Dynasty early in the ninth century A.D., which was annexed by Byzantium in 1045, which then lost the territory to the Seljuk Turks following the Battle of Manzikert in 1071. The Georgian Kingdom took the region from the Seljuks from the late 12th century to the early 13th century, until various Mongol rulers of the Ilkhanate, including Tamerlane, took control of the area in the 13th and 14th centuries. The region was conquered by the Ottoman Empire in 1517 and often fought over and taken by the Safavids.

The Ararat anomaly is an interesting feature located on the northwest corner of the Western Plateau of Mount Ararat (approximately 39°42′10″N, 44°16′30″E) at about 4,724 meters (15,500 feet), some 2.2 km (1.4 miles) west of the 5,137 m (16,854 ft) summit, on the edge of what appears from the photographs to be a steep downward slope. It is claimed by a number of Biblical literalists that this anomaly is the remains of Noah's Ark (from the Old Testament).




Biblical Places in Turkey

  Adramyttium   

    Antioch   

    Assos      

    Attalia      

 Bithniya  (Nicaea) 

Cappadocia  

Carchemish

Cnidus

Colossae

Derbe

Ephesus Acts

 Euphrates River 

Galatia Province

Harran

Hierapolis

Iconium

Istanbul 

Laodecia

Lystra

Miletus

Mt. Ararat

Myra

Nicea

Patara 

Perga

Pergamum

Philadelphia

 Pisidian Antioch 

Sardis

Seleucia

Smyrna

Tarsus 

Thyatira

Tigris River

Troas

Troy

 
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Ephesus Tours Team